Stop attending the solar eclipse on Facebook

‘Is that not a night at the art school?’


Legions of students this past month have optimistically clicked “going” to the solar eclipse on Facebook. 

Stop it – it’s in the sky and you have no choice.

The sun’s diameter is 400 times that of the moon, but because the moon is 400 times closer to the earth it is possible for the moon to entirely obscure our view of the sun – apparently.

This is a pretty rare phenomenon: the next solar eclipse scheduled for the 12 August 2026, but we won’t even be able to see this solar eclipse in Britain.

No, the next solar eclipse that will be visible from the British Isles won’t take place until 2090.

If you didn’t care that this was happening before, you are probably now marginally more likely to.

When asked about the solar eclipse, exploring the Cosmos student, Duncan Murray-Uren retorted: “Is that not a night at the art school?”

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I hate to say it, especially since you are all so excited, you probably won’t even see it.

The eclipse on Friday will be visible from 8:30am – so you will all be in bed – and will peak at around 9:30am – when you will still all be in bed.

It’s hardly necessary for me to remind you, but this is Glasgow – when was the last time you actually saw the sun?

Admittedly the forecast for Friday claims an ever optimistic “partially cloudy” – but it will probably be pissing it down and fucking freezing.

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How dramatic is that sky?

Even if you are keen enough to get up early to see this rare and beautiful natural occurrence, and you’re lucky enough to get a window of blue sky, then you might be disappointed.

The fullest extent of the eclipse visible from the British Isles will be on the Isle of Lewis in the outer Hebrides – but even if you can make it to Lewis you will only experience a partial solar eclipse of 98 per cent – so tantalisingly close.

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the hebrides are well worth the visit – still cold and cloudy though

If you do miss the solar eclipse this week, fear not, there will be a wholly less spectacular lunar eclipse this September.