We asked Warwick’s French students all the questions you wish you could

Because they do more than sit in the Learning Grid raving about Enter

Warwick University has a large French community and for sure, you know at least a couple of French students. But how do they feel about living here, the French community at Warwick and all those pesky stereotypes floating about? We set out to find out.

Max Mireur, second year, International Business, from Marseille

What does it mean to you to be French and how do you feel about being French?

I am proud to be French. Being French is more than eating cheese, frog legs and snails, which actually very few French people have eaten at least once in their lifetime.

What was your first-year experience at Warwick as an international student?

In the first year, I was part of the Warwick Novice Rowing Team. It was a great opportunity to be involved in a truly British environment and to hang out with people from outside the large French speaking community in Warwick. I have a lot of respect for those who manage to stay committed to rowing during their entire degree, it is truly phenomenal.

Are there things you don’t understand or like here? 

I don’t understand how British girls manage to wear such short and fluorescent outfits for a night out in February. Also, a bit too much French people. Sometimes feels like I’m going out in Paris.

What’s the best thing about Warwick for you?  

First year that accounts for zero per cent of your degree. In first year, everyone should have this in mind when hesitating between a night out and a 9a.m lecture.

Célia Khoury, first year, International Business, from Paris

What do you miss about Home? 

All the food like cheese or baguette and my family/friends. Finally, Paris, the city itself in general and Lebanese food or should I say hummus?

Did you notice some “cultural differences”?

Yes, the way people dress, more casual, open-minded more relax, no one judges. Feel free and everyone is friendly.

Do you feel like there are lots of stereotypes against you?

Everyone is from Paris, we love the same things, we always stick together and are not willing to mix with other students. Then, we party a lot (Enter, Smack on Tuesdays or Neon), we are all good-looking kids, all studying in WBS. But we are all different. I don’t like the image that students have of us in general.

French words to give to other students?

“Très tchatcheur”, an art of flirting in a talkative way.

How do you find Warwick campus and life here?

Everything is possible here. It’s all about us and what we want to do. For instance, I did the Jail Break challenge and we went to Amsterdam. I also plan to do the 24-hours challenge in the library. Finally, one thing I really enjoyed was the dog destress day because dogs are my life.

Raphael Charignon, second year International Management, from Paris

What does it mean to you to be French?

For me, the meaning of being French is embodying French elegance and the fact that we just enjoy living.

Did you notice some “cultural differences”?

Yes, people have their pre-drinks much earlier and get drunk much before us. They party in the week whereas we party at the weekend. The whole notion of “party” is a bit downgraded here in my opinion.

Do you feel like there are lots of stereotypes against you?

We’re suffering obviously from the usual stereotypes about food and pompousness but in Warwick University, it’s surprisingly true and most French students unconsciously replicate these patterns without knowing.

Tell us something crazy that has happened to you at Warwick 

I managed to create my own society (HYPEBEASTS society) about clothing but it’s far and away from the over-complicated French way of doing things, it aims at individual empowerment, simplicity and inclusivity.

Camille de La Rocque, second year, International Management, from Paris

What do you miss about home?

I miss the food and the café terraces mostly.

Are there things you don’t understand or like here?

The fact that there are two taps: one for hot and hot for cold water. Also, who starts drinking at 7pm?

Do you feel like there are lots of stereotypes against you?

Being French means spending your time in the Learning Grid, going to Smack on Tuesdays exclusively, good cooking skills and spending an unreasonable amount of time at Costa. Of course, I’m proud to be French. These stereotypes aren’t completely true. For instance, I don’t cook well. However, I wish the French community was a little bit more open sometimes…

French words to give to other students?

“Gênant”, means awkward. It can be very useful.

Arthur Roux de Bezieux, first year, International Business, From Annecy, Haute Savoie

What does it mean to you to be French and how do you feel about being French?

You just need to hate Mike Brown and English Rugby in general. I feel proud but I don’t consider it to exactly define me.

Do you feel like there are lots of stereotypes about you?

Being French doesn’t mean that you only come from Paris, that you are a fashionista or someone arrogant. But, it’s true that we tend to complain all the time.

Tell us something funny that has happened to you at Warwick 

I went to a 9am lecture.

French words to give to other students?

“Putain” works for any feeling you want to express.

“C’est luxe” when you really appreciate something.

“Enculé” to someone you love.

“Cher” very.

How do you find Warwick campus and life here?

I find Warwick University appreciable although very French. The campus is nice but very isolated. As a student, I have plenty of time to do what I want. I didn’t expect that I would have so few hours of class per week. English schedules are weird.

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