Here are our top tips for Tramlines this year

Our top picks for the bands you don’t want to miss


Sheffield's premier music event returns this weekend and the line up is looking bigger and better than ever before.

So, in order to help you spend your time wisely, here are our picks for the best bands at Tramlines in 2019.

Shame – Music for shaggers

Saturday – Leadmill Stage – 20:45

Blending punk and post-punk influences into a symphony of rock and roll, Shame's rapid rise saw them become one of the largest names in the UK punk scene in just over a year, revitalising a genre declining in relevance since its peak in the late 70s.

Much like their punk forefathers, Shame's visceral social commentary is built upon the culture of chaos in an increasingly fractured Britain, making them one of the most exciting and relevant contemporary bands.

From the anthemic 'One Rizla' to the lucid storytelling of 'The Lick', Shame's eclectic, unique style and enthralling live performance is the perfect antithesis to the overhyped piss Courteeners have released recently.

Sports Team – Southerners telling weird stories about roundabouts

Saturday – Leadmill Stage – 18:30

Everyone looks at me weirdly when I compare Sports Team to Sheffield music legends Pulp and with good reason. Outwardly, the two bands have very few musical similarities – Pulp shimmer, while Sports Team ooze.

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But, in their own unique way, the lyrical cynicism and erratic, somewhat bizarre storytelling is the closest any Indie band have ever come to replicating the lyrical genius of Jarvis Cocker.

Maybe I am mental, maybe the men in white coats should come and take me away. Maybe everyone will hate me now. But unless you go to watch them you won't ever know, so at least reserve your judgement until then.

Please direct all hate mail to musicissubjectivesofuckoff@thetab.com

The Seamonsters – Refreshing and Diverse Approach to Indie

Friday – Leadmill Stage – 16:15

Tab favourites and Sheffield's own, The Seamonsters, return to Hillsborough Park for the second consecutive year following a slot opening T'Other stage last Year.

Once crowned as Sheffield's indie pop queens, the past few years have seen the Seamonsters sound evolve, moving away from their roots. From the punk inspired live favourite "Are You With The Band" to the 90's psych-pop "Hawaiian Space Bop", or the dark romance of "L'Amour est un jeu fou" – The Seamonsters' diverse musical style is impossible to pigeonhole.

As the lineal torchbearers of the city's strong indie pop history, The Seamonsters have cast off the shackles of expectation and blazed their own trail in the music scene. As this year's Exposed Magazine winners for best unsigned band, they are promising a set you don't want to miss.

Children of the State – Eclectic, pysch-inspired rock and roll

Saturday – Leadmill Stage – 16:30

Given the relatively small size of their back catalogue, local band Children of the State are about as diverse as it comes in musical terms. Their music is crammed full of little touches, nods to past eras, to delight the musical nerds amongst us.

Working with Fat White Family's Nathan Saoudi, the sound in their latest EP, Gideon's Bible (by far and away their best work) shifts from John Lennon inspired, Beatles-esque rock to luscious 70's psych full of soulful sax and dreams of a bygone era of drug fulled rock.

They are a slow burner, but a band certain to work their way into your mind, make their home there and never leave.

BlackWaters – Party punk attitude

Sunday – The Library Stage – 17:45

BlackWaters are a raucous punk band that ooze a crazy party atmosphere. But hidden behind this wild nature is fantastic musical talent and an ear for a catchy chorus that has aided their success so far.

Standout songs include the thoroughbred punk tune "Fuck Yeah", the outrageously catchy "Let The Good Times Roll" and the abrasive "Down".

A band certain to put on an exciting live show, BlackWaters are not to be missed.