REVIEW: Full Frontal Prudity

Henry Nurick and Vineet Naik were left with mixed opinions after Full Frontal Prudity

Comedy pembroke players the tab Theatre

True to the spirit of a traditional pub, Full Frontal Prudity is full of characters – some memorable, some less so.

Photo Credit: Ellie Gould

Photo Credit: Ellie Gould

Full Frontal Prudity takes place in the idyllic ‘Cricketer’s Legs’, and is home to many eccentric characters. The pub landlord (Ruari Bride) with his iconic flat cap sets the stage for much of the show’s farcical charades and plays the role of a compere while also partaking in the sketches. The rest of the cast (Adam Woolf, Enrico Hallworth, and Jasmine Rees) take on many different roles and hilarity ensues – for the most part.

Enrico Hallworth opened the first sketch and throughout effectively delivered deadpan humour, with a particularly memorable portrayal of an anthropomorphic mastiff. However, this was somewhat undercut by instances of corpsing, most notably during the “Cowboy” sketch performed with Jasmine Rees, who held the scene together well and was convincing at times. The comedic talents of the troupe were most effectively displayed in the “MI6” sketch involving a superb mix of straight-faced delivery and punning.

Photo Credit: Ellie Gould

Photo Credit: Ellie Gould

Musical interludes were a welcome addition to the show, with an astonishingly compelling rendition of “Next Hype” by Adam Woolf, who made up for the somewhat nondescript lyricism by effectively channelling Tempa T’s famously aggressive persona. The bellicose atmosphere transcended the moments of lyrical weakness and was carried through in highly believable slapstick violence. In contrast to this song, Ruari Bride demonstrated impressive musical talent in his original ditty “Stash”, which distinctly appealed to the Cambridge audience.

Despite a few slack-wristed punch lines, Full Frontal Prudity promises an entertaining evening (and a free glass of beer!) for students looking for some end of term amusement.

3/5 stars