Tuition fee increase has minimal impact on mental health

New research published last week, spearheaded by the University of Southampton and the Solent NHS Trust has found that the rise in tuition fees has had little effect on the […]


New research published last week, spearheaded by the University of Southampton and the Solent NHS Trust has found that the rise in tuition fees has had little effect on the mental well-being of students.

tuition-fees_1568126c

The Conservatives’ 2011 fee hike, from £3000 a year to £9000, was widely protested by students and academics, but this study suggests the effects on student life may not be as severe as expected.

Dr Thomas Richardson, who led the research, said: “Previous studies have found a relationship between financial difficulties … and poor mental health in British students”, suggesting “it may be the ability to pay the bills, rather than the size of the student loan itself, that is important to wellbeing while at university.”

The study found no difference in long term mental health of students from various fee-paying groups, but found that students paying lower fees showed greater symptoms of alcohol dependence.

Dr Richardson’s study also concluded that eating disorders may be more prevalent in female students suffering financial difficulties. The news comes as Student Minds launch their Eating Disorder Awareness Week, aiming to promote a supportive environment for those suffering.

Do you feel more pressured by high tuition fees? Let us know in the comments below!