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Only two universities spend more per student on their mental health services than Cambridge

According to our 2017 Mental Health Rankings

Cambridge mental health Cambridge Rankings the tab

The Tab's Mental Health Rankings 2017 has found that Cambridge spends £38.96 per student, well above the national average of £21.80. They are also ahead of the game in spending per applicant, spending £486.97 with the national average being £325.90.

This gives the university a finance score of 25.34 out of 40, compared to the national average of 17.29. However, the university may be happy to dish out money but is lagging behind in mental health satisfaction rankings, scoring 34.07 out of a possible 40, behind the national average of 34.55 and leaving us 27th out of the 47 universities surveyed. The scores combined left Cambridge with an overall ranking of 7th out of 47.

Although the universities financial score is high, the satisfaction score is below the national average.

The survey compiled results from over 9000 students speaking out about their experiences and is the only study of its kind. The Tab commented that 'Universities have a duty of care for their students and mental health falls squarely under this. We're aiming to paint the truest picture of mental health at university, and how it's handled.'

When asked about the rankings, the university replied:

'This ranking, like others, places Cambridge in the top ten institutions in the UK.'

Whilst accurate, the statement shows a complacency from the university. Whilst these results are positive, the low satisfaction ranking demonstrates the university still has a ways to go in their mental health services.

The University of Reading topped the Mental Health rankings

In contrast, the table toppers, Reading, said 'We're pleased that the University of Reading has come out top of the Tab's Mental Health rankings this year- but we're not complacent about meeting the needs that our students have for their wellbeing.'

We here at The Tab love a bit of humour, but only when it's appropriate. Maybe Cambridge could learn something from Reading and not be so 'complacent' about these findings.