The Rent Strikers have forced UoB to make 400 rooms cheaper

But the strike is set to continue


Bristol University have promised to cut the price of hundreds of rooms next year, in a 'huge win' for protesting students.

A row over affordability had been brewing since over 150 current halls residents refused to pay rent last week. In response, University bosses have now committed to setting rent at below 50 per cent of the maximum maintenance loan in 400 rooms.

Other concessions included a pledge to match price changes with inflation, meaning that rent shouldn't rise faster than the cost of living going forward. The strike, however, is set to continue.

Image may contain: Flame, Parade, Clothing, Apparel, Fire, People, Text, Human, Person

The changes come after representatives of the rent strikers met with members of the University Residential and Hospitality team last week. The meeting was described as productive and as well as the headline cuts to rents, greater transparency on halls spending was promised, while striking students were told they would face no punishments.

However, even with the extra 400 rooms, just 5 per cent of total spaces will cost less than half of the maximum maintenance loan, far lower than the 50 per cent of rooms that students had been calling for.

A number of other demands have also been rejected so far, including a call to compensate students paying rent to the University and its partners at the current rates.

Image may contain: Military Uniform, Military, Parade, People, Footwear, Clothing, Apparel, Shoe, Banner, Text, Crowd, Human, Person

Nonetheless, a statement from Bristol, Cut the Rent, who have organised the strike, celebrated the 'huge wins'.

"Only after a week of the strike, we have already seen some huge wins that will really benefit students joining the University and living in halls next year".

"This shows the power of students coming together and taking direct action".

A further meeting is due to take place next Monday, with representatives of the strikers set to make further demands.