We’re not doomed: Graduates earn £500,000 more than those with no degree

High rollers

Heart-warming new research reveals that you stand to make up to £500,000 more over the course of your lifetime than someone who didn’t go to university.

Degree-less job seekers stand to earn up to £12,000 a year less than those who enter the job market as graduates.

Over an average working lifetime this adds up to a whopping half a million quid in our pocket.


If you graduated from one of the UK’s top universities, you’re on track for a lucrative starting salary

Sign up now for high paid graduate jobs at Times Top 100 Employers


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The jobs website Adzuna analysed 1,000,000 vacancies in June and reported a rapidly expanding gap between graduates and non-graduates.

They also said overall opportunities are improving for both.

There were 62,750 entry level jobs available to graduates last month across the UK, a 15.7pc increase on 2014.

Over 350,000 graduates are streaming out of university and into the world of work this summer – all expected to battle for one of those 62,750 jobs.

On average there are there are 3.98 applicants to every graduate position – a figure which rises dramatically to over 35 in the more competitive regions of London and the South East.


If you graduated from one of the UK’s top universities, you’re on track for a lucrative starting salary

Sign up now for high paid graduate jobs at Times Top 100 Employers


If you’re after the highest paid grad jobs – with an average pay close to £40,000 – you’d need to be a high-flying Cambridge student, according to Adzuna.

If you’ve just graduated from Cardiff there’s bad news: you ought to expect to earn significantly less than the national average.

The top five graduate degrees by pay, are all (unsurprisingly) incredibly boring: Civil Engineering, Engineering, Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.

According to government statistics, postgraduates and graduates continue to have higher employment rates and are more likely to work in high-skilled jobs than non-graduates.

Working-age, full-time employed, graduates will earn an average of £31,000 this year, the government says, compared to £22,100 for non-graduates.

This comes as great news after maintenance grants were scrapped last week – making our uni education significantly more expensive.

The precious grants, worth up to £3,387 per year, will now need to be paid back in full after graduation from 2016-17.

But the government claim they’re burning a hole in the Business Department’s pocket – costing a staggering £1.6 billion per year.


If you graduated from one of the UK’s top universities, you’re on track for a lucrative starting salary

Sign up now for high paid graduate jobs at Times Top 100 Employers


 

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