Crime at highest level for five years as security spending continues to fall

Thefts nearly doubled between 2013 and last year

assault campus costs crime spending Stirling Uni theft

Campus criminals are running amok with the total number of security incidents recorded by the uni at a five-year high.

This surge in criminal activity comes at the same time that university spending on security has been cut for three years in a row.

Over £26,000 has been cut from the security staffing costs between 2011 and 2014, while the number of security incidents per year more than doubled over the same time period.

One of the fastest-growing types of criminal activity is theft, with the number nearly doubling between 2013 and 2014.

Over the same period of time, disorderly crime also shot up from 13 incidents to a shocking 35.

Public enemy No.1 for breaking and entering in Geddes and Ally Court

Public enemy No.1 for breaking and entering in Geddes and Ally Court

Not all crime is on the rise however. Incidents of assault continue to decrease, with only four cases reported to the university in 2014. Traffic security incidents also fell in 2014, though only by three to a total of 26.

In total, over-worked security staff had to deal with 191 incidents last year, a massive increase from the 97 reported cases in 2010.

Traffic incidents decreased in 2014 after rising sharply in 2013

Traffic incidents decreased in 2014 after rising sharply in 2013

When asked to explain the lack of investment in the security services, a university spokesperson said there has been no general decrease in investment.

They said: “We regularly review our systems and procedures to ensure they are effective. The expenditure indicated reflects only some aspects of the service and there has been no decrease in investment or level of service. The increase in the number of incidents reflects an improved system of reporting incidents.

“The variation in expenditure on security personnel is entirely due to staffing matters including pay progression, national pay awards and, when it has shown a decrease, staff with long service retiring and being replaced with individuals appointed at a lower starting point on the salary scale.”

When asked for more information regarding non-staff security costs, a university spokesperson said no records are held by the university and so they are unable to provide accurate figures.

Total security incidents at Stirling Uni have increased for the fifth year in a row