Return of the male hair band

In the spirit of election week, I am campaigning for the headband to make a return from the 80s for the male sex. Brothers, for too long the purchase of […]


In the spirit of election week, I am campaigning for the headband to make a return from the 80s for the male sex.

Brothers, for too long the purchase of hair accessories has been condemned, and quite frankly, it needs to stop. Hair bands are functional. Fellow brederin with long, fluffy and curvaceously floppy locks – I write this for you.

The dichotomy of long male hair growth needs to be broken down, in order to kill the dilemma of long inconvenient locks vs. a buzz cut. I want long hair at the same time as demanding unimpaired vision. The two should not be mutually exclusive. Am I asking too much?

Don’t even get me started on the practical aide the hair band offers when introduced to the forum of physically strenuous activity. Hand-eye coordination is significantly hindered if one’s visuals are impeded. Ask Roger Federer, he may look great but there are also practical reasons behind his designated style.

Image

Why did they ever stop? That’s the question on my mind. John McEnroe wore a headband and did so with pride. I endeavour to reintegrate the headband as a staple hair accessory among the male student body of St Andrews. It is a good look and one that we should be proud to flaunt in our rather fashionable institution.

Slowly but surely, more peers are rockin’ it but unfortunately, they are still not quite as prominent as salmon coloured trousers or Canada Goose jackets. It’s not right that fellow brothers might walk into Accessorize or Claire’s Accessories with shame. If you empathise with the brotherhood and wish to see more fellas wearing bands of the head – jump aboard this juggernaut in the quest for gender equality in the world of hair accessories.

Image

images  © afflictor and tennis.com