The Tab Joins FemSoc…*

*…for ‘An Evening of Women’s Bits’ as part of International Women’s Week, performed in the Bridge. I wasn’t really sure what to expect as I approached the Bridge for what […]


*…for ‘An Evening of Women’s Bits’ as part of International Women’s Week, performed in the Bridge.

I wasn’t really sure what to expect as I approached the Bridge for what one cast member described as “an evening of listening to women”.  After heading straight to the bar to try the special ‘women’s’ cocktails (Suffragette Sunrise followed quickly by Pankhurst Punch), I settled down at the back to watch the women get their bits out on stage.

They did have some pretty nice bits.

They did have some pretty nice bits.

The performance, in the style of a showcase, was written, directed and performed by women from the University, both students and staff. One of the best things about this show was that it allowed people who wouldn’t necessarily get involved in performance normally to give it a go, and the Bridge’s cosy atmosphere gave them the confidence to perform. Special mention here must be given to one Rosie Wassi, who performed a cover of ‘Ride’ by Lana Del Rey, the first time she had sung in front of an audience.

The show was stolen whenever Grace Pattle and her acoustic guitar graced the stage, with her flawlessly talented performances of Alt J’s ‘Breezeblocks’ and a brilliant and moving self-composition which was dedicated to her mother. Sarah Divall  performed ‘Sexual Symbols’, a piece about Beyonce, with power and gusto, showing the importance of positivity and self-confidence, regardless of gender.

Strong performances were also given by Harriet Notton who caught the audiences’ attention straight away with her emotive monologue ‘Catherine’ from ‘The Memory Of Water’, and Caitlin Meredith, who brought a great comic element to the evening, with her brilliantly performed ‘Nursery School – Free Activity Period’ by Joyce Grenfell.

However, as much as this was an empowering event for the performers, I feel that in future, the event should perhaps be more angled towards feminism in terms of the equality between both women and men. The separation of genders, even if for the purposes of celebration such as in this case, could potentially still be seen as an assertion of power for the reassurance of equality.

The evening was co-ordinated by Emma Real-Davies and Ruth Walker. I voiced my doubts to Ruth, who told me:

We just wanted to celebrate women, and give them the opportunity to perform, an experience which some of them have never had.”

With that goal in mind, ‘An Evening of Women’s Bits’ definitely succeeded.

All of the money from the event is going to Southampton’s Women’s Aid.