Reasons not to cry about the proposed rise in tuition fees

It won’t be apocalyptic


The government’s proposal to raise tuition fees to £9,250 per year as of 2017 has become the topic of tension for students everywhere. Yet, in our reactionary rage are we overlooking the benefits of the rise in fees?

Yes, the fees mean that you would be left with extra debt, but this might not be the apocalyptic change that some are making it out to be.

Universities are non-profit organisations, so whatever you pay goes straight towards your university experience. This could be particularly beneficial since Brexit plans to cut funding for many institutions.

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Furthermore, paying extra would ensure that your degree retains its value. If you applied to a Russell Group uni, chances are you care about the reputation of the institution you attend. Without increased funding a university finds it harder each year to compete.

So if universities at the top fall short of the standards required to uphold their reputation, then your degree could lose value to employers. It would be like paying for a Jägerbomb, and getting your drink without the shot of Jägermeister – it’s nothing special anymore.

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This rise wouldn’t necessarily affect those on low income either. Universities have to uphold their commitment to current and future students that need extra funding. The grants and financial aid required, will only be increased by these fees. It might seem like a paradox, but the extra £250 a year could actually allow for greater equality.

The universities minister is also making plans to ensure these rises allow for better teaching – finally giving you a reason not to fall asleep in that lecture you hate, or take a course that wasn’t available before.

Although, KCLSU’s Vice President for Education issued a statement explaining how “students should not have to pay any more for their education”, maybe we should also consider these benefits. If the rise in fees will uphold the reputation of your degree, the quality of student life and the prospects for those that follow, perhaps it’s a price worth paying.