How to bluff your way through Cricket Varsity

The Tab gives you its definitive guide to Cricket Varsity

Cricket Varsity EUMHC the tab the tab exeter

Cricket Varsity offers the potential for a great day sat in the sunshine relaxing in front of the splendidly English game of cricket.

A large proportion of those turning up tomorrow won’t be able to tell their bowlers from their batsmen, however, so here’s The Tab‘s top ten tips to help bluff your way through the day:

1. Outfits

Unlike the usual cricketing whites, to make differentiating between the sides just that little bit easier, Exeter will be playing in green and Bristol in red.

Exeter will be wearing their customary green.

Exeter will be wearing their customary green

 2. The Toss

The two captains, before the start of the game, toss a coin to determine who will be batting, and who will be bowling first.

The Captain will often discuss with the Coach what to do at the toss.

The Captain will often discuss with the Coach what to do at the toss

3. Batting

The batsmen are the two chaps in the middle of the pitch wearing all the protective equipment. Their job is to score as many runs as possible in the allotted overs.

Two batsmen having a chat, probably about what they will be eating at Tea

Two batsmen having a chat, probably about what they will be eating at Tea

4. Bowling

The bowlers job is to try and get the batsmen ‘out’ and send them back to the pavilion. If they get 10 batsmen ‘out,’ the batting team are all out.

This batsman has just been got 'out' and must return disappointed to the pavilion.

This batsman has just been got ‘out’ and must return to the pavilion

5. Innings

Each team has an innings. In this instance, each innings will be 50 overs. (An over includes six balls by the bowler.) Ultimately, the team who scores the most runs in their innings wins the game.

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Guns like these will be on show, too

6. Runs

Batters can score ‘runs’ by either running the 22 yard pitch or hitting boundaries. Boundaries come in 4s and 6s. If it bounces before going over the rope, it is a four. If it goes on the full, it is a six.

An Exeter batsman attempting to score runs.

An Exeter batsman attempting to score runs

7. Dismissals:

More commonly known as wickets, there are 11 forms of dismissal. The ones to remember are:

  • Bowled: Where the bowler hits the batsman’s stumps with the ball
  • Caught: Where the batsman hits the ball in the air and is caught by a fielder
  • LBW (Leg Before wWicket): Put simply, this involves the batsman being hit on the leg by the bowler in front of the stumps
  • Run Out: The batsmen attempt to run but the fielder hits the stumps with the ball before it can be completed.

8. Other dismissals

If you want to be really clever, Google the other modes of dismissal: stumped, hit wicket, retired, handled the ball, hit the ball twice, obstructing the field and timed out.

Some of the spectators at last year's Varsity

Some of the spectators at last year’s Varsity

9. Tea

In true English fashion, the players break between innings for tea. Supporters often use this break for some refreshments of their own.

Hog Roast- perfect for the spectators' tea break.

Hog Roast: perfect for the spectators’ tea break

10. And finally…

If you’re still clueless, drink plenty of alcohol and everything will appear considerably more entertaining.

Whatever happens, the forecast promises for a lovely day in the sun.

Whatever happens, the forecast promises for a lovely day in the sun.