Gang who murdered Newcastle medics were ‘high on crystal meth’

Police report says ‘crime has been solved’ as suspects confess


The gang who murdered two Newcastle medics were “high on crystal meth” – according to police. 

Three of the four men arrested tested positive for methamphetamine, also known as crystal meth. Police say all suspects have confessed to the double murder and could now face execution.

One suspect has previously been convicted for drug dealing while another had been convicted of gang robbery.

Aidan (left) and Neil (right) were tragically killed just before they were due to return home...

Aidan (left) and Neil (right) were tragically killed just before they were due to return home

Aidan Brunger and Neil Dalton were brutally killed in Kuching, Malaysia, after an argument with locals. Reports say they were accused of being too noisey.

The men, both aged 22, were found lying in the road with stab wounds in the chest and back on Abell Road at 4:15am on Wednesday morning.

The men arrived in June for a six week placement at Sarawak General Hospital in Kuching.

Representatives for the family of Neil Dalton stand outside the family home in Belper, Derbyshire

Representatives for the family of Neil Dalton stand outside the family home in Belper, Derbyshire

Deputy police commissioner Chai Khin Chung said police in Borneo had now finished their investigation, as the men had confessed.

He said: “We have finished our investigation, the crime has been solved.

“The suspects have been apprehended and they have admitted the crime. We have recovered the weapons from the crime.

“We are waiting for the corpses in the hospital mortuary to have the post-mortem carried out. We have all the major evidence in our hands which we will send to the prosecution.”

Two members of university staff have flown to Kuching to organise the return of the students.

Medics 2nd team football captain Neil Dalton

Neil Dalton

Adrian Brunger

Aidan Brunger

Professor Reg Jordan, of Newcastle University, is one of the two now in Kuching, Borneo. He said:  “Our priority is supporting the families, and our students who are still here and we are working with the authorities to ensure they can return home as soon as possible. We met with the students this afternoon and we are giving whatever help we can in these tragic circumstances.

“Neil and Aidan were doing what thousands of medical students do every year by gaining valuable medical experience overseas.

“They were both excellent and committed students with so much potential, who will be greatly missed by everyone in the medical school. The whole University deeply mourns their loss.”